Sweet Dream


How do you pay homage to your favorite drink? Well, you could name your yacht after it.

That’s what the owners of the Outer Reef 860 CPMY (cockpit motoryacht) did. Ti Punch takes her name from an island favorite flavored-rum cocktail. The word ti (pronounced tee) in Creole means petite, or small. Wel

l, there’s nothing small about the 860, be it the size of the yacht or the imagination of her owners.

Outwardly, the 860 commands a second look. Broad shoulders in the form of generous bow flare blend aft along the faux-planked hull and a high freeboard. The exterior is accented by a Kingston-gray Awlgrip stripe that runs along the top sheer line of the hull, hinting at the contemporary color scheme found within her interior spaces.


Video of Outer Reef 860 CPMY Ti Punch

That impressive interior starts off with a voluminous salon. There’s a semicircular bar with granite countertop, glass stowage and fridge in the port aft corner plus an entertainment center with a flat-screen TV to starboard — a great setup for having afternoon cocktails and then stepping out to watch the sun set. An L-shaped sofa to port and a ­starboard-side love seat make for a nice after-dinner conversation spot. A coffee table, end tables, an ottoman and bar stools offer more seating, and there’s still plenty of room for guests to stand and mingle. A mirrored-ceiling inlay adds to the open feel of the room.

The owners really put their stamp on Ti Punch, including the use of high-gloss American walnut cabinetry and varying shades of blue and gray (separately and in combination) for her interior color theme. Gray is not my favorite color, as I often associate it with naval vessels, but it is used throughout the galley and forward dining/helm area, and I have to admit that I liked it. It may come across as a bit utilitarian, but it’s easy on the eyes, defines the space between the salon and forward areas, allows for ample light to brighten the interior spaces and works well with the wood and fabrics.



In the galley, all of the upper and lower cabinets are finished in a gray veneer, which complements the stainless-steel appliances, including the Bosch dishwasher, KitchenAid trash compactor, Bosch full-size oven and four-burner cooktop, and LG microwave. Across the way is an LG side-by-side refrigerator/freezer and six-drawer pantry finished in a satin-­walnut veneer. The granite countertops are gray-infused, highlighted with flecks of blue. Chrome push-button latches on drawers and doors are a classy touch.

Forward of the galley are the dinette and helm. An L-shaped settee to port lets guests sit for a meal or take in the view underway. The dinette table is finished like the counters, gray with blue highlights, and works with the varying light-and-dark-gray-patterned cushions.

A wall raises and lowers hydraulically behind the dinette seat, separating the salon and galley spaces from the dinette and helm. Close it from the lower station for privacy or during night cruising, or keep it open for stem-to-stern visibility. A pocket door closes off the walkway.

Five large windows allow for easy viewing from the lower helm. Wrapped in gray vinyl, the helm can accommodate almost any electronics suite an owner desires. Ti Punch has three Masters display monitors running Furuno software, ABT-TRAC bow and stern thrusters and Caterpillar engine monitors. Twin Stidd helm chairs ensure the pilot and co-pilot are kept comfortable on long passages.



Access to the staterooms is via a stairway to starboard of the helm. There’s nothing small about the full-beam master, which has a king-size berth (7 inches of cushy mattress), two cedar lockers, six cabinets, two vanities, four portlights, nine LED overhead lights, twin sinks in the head and one large shower stall. Gray vinyl padding on some walls accents the varnished beachwood finish.

Forward is a VIP stateroom featuring a tapered queen berth, twin cedar lockers and an en suite head with shower. A guest stateroom aft and to port has a twin berth, and the fourth space to starboard has over-under bunks, which is a great spot for the kids.

Like the 860’s salon, her upper deck is expansive and the helm area is the gathering point. It’s a full-beam setup with twin Stidd helm chairs, port and starboard L-shaped settees with tables, full controls for the captain and a hardtop secured like the Rock of Gibraltar. Ti Punch’s owners opted for a full enclosure, which converts this spot into an all-weather area with an ­air-conditioning/reverse-heat system.

Behind the aft curtains are stowage cabinets and a food-prep station with sink, grill and fridge. This is the place for afternoon lunch in the Bahamas. Swing gates section off the after end of the deck that houses the davit, Sea-Doo and inflatable tender. The gates are a great safety feature, especially if there are little ones or pets roaming the deck.

The owners powered this long-range, 95-ton, horizon-chasing yacht with twin 1,150-horsepower Caterpillar C18 ACERT diesels, which are surrounded by sturdy grab rails. All servicing points are easily accessible, as are the Racor filters, sea chests and fuel-management valves. The engine room’s solid floor panels lift effortlessly for access to the bilge.


Specifications Builder Supplied Number
LOA: 85’8″
BEAM: 21’0″
DRAFT: 5’6″
DISPL.: 190,000 lb.
FUEL: 3,000 gal.
WATER: 500 gal.
DEADRISE: 7 degrees
ENGINES (tested): 2 x 1,150 hp Caterpillar C18 ACERT diesels
BASE PRICE: $4,235,588
PRICE AS TESTED: $5,000,000

Outer Reef must follow the adage that “a happy crew means a happy yacht,” because the crew quarters just abaft the engine room are pretty stylish. A settee with table, fridge, microwave, cooktop and TV fit out the galley, with berths for two to three people and a head with shower stall.

Back at sea level there’s a fighting-chair-equipped lower cockpit because the owners are into fishing, diving and other on-the-water activities. Ti Punch also has a swim platform that’s more like a mini beach, a great spot to catch some rays in a secluded cove.

Outer Reef sales representative Mike Schlichtig said these owners’ cruising plans have changed from those of their previous yacht, an 82-footer. Desiring to spend more time fishing and scuba diving, and to have a full-time captain, the owners wanted a “setup for getting out of Dodge.” That’s not uncommon, with boater demographics changing when it comes to yachts like those from Outer Reef. “Clients are now in their 50s, where seven years ago they were 65 to 70 years old,” commented Schlichtig. He added that buyers are looking for a yacht that offers the feeling of a home environment, but with more range.

Secure handling and maneuverability were evident on the 860 as we navigated the constricted New River in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and then hit the open water. With the ABT-TRAC stabilizers energized and the pointy end effortlessly knocking down a 3-foot white-capped chop, there was nary a bump, grind or groan to be had. Outer Reef’s yachts have a reputation for competently handling open seas, and the 860 is certainly up to the task of maintaining that reputation.

If exploring the sea is your goal, the Outer Reef 860 CPMY deserves your attention. She’s built for going long, is finished to a high standard, and can be tailored to just about any owner’s desire. You can even name her after your favorite cocktail, but sorry … Ti Punch is already taken.


Built For The Sea

The Outer Reef 860 CPMY comes from three molds and features a hand-laid, solid fiberglass hull bottom with PVC coring used above the waterline for added strength without added weight. Her hull is finished in a white gelcoat, while a vinylester barrier prevents osmosis and blistering. Full-length engine stringers give her structure serious backbone. There is a full keel that extends below the propellers to protect the 860’s running gear in the event of an accidental grounding. Outer Reef’s patented Quiet Roll spray-rail system aims to deflect water in big seas and reduce hull noise, making all passages peaceful ones.

Source: Yachting